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Umalusi statement on the occasion of the announcement of approval for the release of the following examination results, 30 December 2014

 

1.    INDEPENDENT EXAMINATIONS BOARD (IEB) – NSC AND GETC:ABET

2.    SOUTH AFRICAN COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT INSTITUTE (SACAI) – NSC

3.    BENCHMARK – GETC

4.    DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION (DBE) – NSC

5.    DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING (DHET) – GETC:ABET; NATED N1-N3 PROGRAMMES; NC(V)

Members of the media,

Ladies and gentlemen,

 

Ø     Over the past few days, commencing on the 15th December 2014, Umalusi’s Assessment Standards Committee has been hard at work reviewing and moderating learner performance in the following qualifications.

Ø     I shall deal with the approval decisions per qualification starting with the NSC. As can be seen from the slide the NSC is offered by three assessment bodies: DBE, IEB and SACAI

Ø     In 2011 Umalusi Council took an unprecedented decision that all standardisation decisions relating to qualifications and part qualifications it quality assures, will in future be made public. The details of the 2014 decisions will be found in your information pack

Ø     Let us now turn to the results of 2014:

.1             NSC Examinations administered by the Department of Basic Education

Ø  In total, 550 127 full time and 138 533 part time candidates were enrolled for the NSC examinations set and administered by the Department of Basic Education.

Ø  Umalusi has taken note of the evidence based reports on interventions and improvement strategies implemented by both national and provincial education authorities and the positive impact of these on the overall assessment system as well as on teaching and learning.

Ø  A total of 58 subjects were presented for standardisation.

Ø  After moderation, raw marks were accepted for 35 subjects. This figure represents 60.3% of the subjects. 

Ø  Of the remaining 23 subjects,

-          Moderation with some upward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile was effected on 13 of the subjects;

-          Moderation with some downward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile was effected on 10 subjects,

Ø  Subjects with upward shifts: Physical Science; Mathematical Literacy; Religion Studies; Hospitality Studies; Agricultural Management Practices; Agricultural Technology; Information Technology; Engineering Graphics and Design; Business Studies; English Home Language; IsiZulu HL; Sepedi HL; Afrikaans FAL;

Ø  Subjects with downward shifts: Life Sciences; Mathematics; Geography; History; Electrical Technology; IsiNdebele HL; Sesotho HL; Setswana FAL; Sepedi FAL; Afrikaans SAL;

Ø  It is perhaps important to highlight the learner performance in a few key subjects:

Ø  Mathematics: had undergone major changes in content. The inclusion of Euclidean geometry and probability together with increase in statistics and data handling and algebra means that the CAPS Mathematics curriculum would prove a challenge to the majority of learners. This was shown in the learner performance in that there is a significant increase in the failure rate compared with 2013.  However the learners at the top experienced the Mathematics examination much easier. Thus there was no adjustment at the bottom end and a slight downward adjustment at the top end.

Ø  Mathematical Literacy: Learners performed significantly worse in 2014 than in any previous year.  Although there were no changes in the format and structure of the examination there was a shift towards exploring and understanding diverse authentic contexts. Paper I was particularly challenging for the learners. An upward adjustment was made at all levels.

Ø  Physical Sciences: The CAPs curriculum represents a slight change in format and structure but a significant increase in the depth (not scope) of the content.  The learners performed worse than 2013 at all levels and so an upward adjustment became necessary.

Ø  Life Sciences: the format and structure in this subject was not affected by CAPS in any significant way. There were however fairly major changes in depth of the content. Yet the learner performance in 2014 was the best in any previous year. However the Pairs analysis shows clearly the 2014 examination was easiest in the group of subjects taken together. A downward adjustment was therefore done.

Ø  Economics: There was a major change in the format and structure of the examination since it was the first year when two papers were written.  There was also a major change in the curriculum since 8 new topics have been added in CAPS. However the learner performance was only slightly down on the 2013 performance but did not warrant any adjustment.

Ø  History: There were major changes in format and structure but not in content. Students were given more flexibility to make choices according to their own strengths. However the examination appear to have been too easy at all levels and a downward adjustment was made to bring it in line with the historic norm.

Ø  Business Studies: Although there were no changes in format and structure and only slight changes in content, the learners really struggled with the 2014 examination. There were too many questions aimed at the top performers. The performance was the worst compared to any other year and so an upward adjustment was done.

 

Irregularities

Ø  Umalusi conducts not only the process of standardisation, which is required for national examinations, but it also, through rigorous procedures, assures the quality of the entire examination process.

Ø  Gaining the approval of Umalusi Council for the release of the results is determined by the examinations’ level of compliance with policies, directives and guidelines issued by both Umalusi and each of the  assessment bodies.

Ø  Before such an approval is granted, Umalusi Council has to satisfy itself that no significant irregularities have occurred to undermine the integrity and the credibility of the examination process.

Ø  Umalusi requires that each assessment body provides a report on irregularities.

Ø  The special investigative audit report from the DBE has shown evidence of what can be called “group copying” in two provinces: KZN and Eastern Cape. Of the 74 centres identified for auditing in KZN, 39 were implicated in cheating and of the 43 centres identified in the Eastern Cape, 19 centres were implicated in group copying.

Ø  Umalusi is very concerned about this trend and takes the view that strong action be taken against those learners and supervisors who have made themselves guilty of these acts of dishonesty. Umalusi will therefore not approve the release of the results of these centres.

Ø  However it should be kept in mind that there are 1741 examination centres in KZN and 924 in the EC. The irregularities occurred in roughly 2% of the centres and so in the view of Umalusi this number does not compromise the integrity of the examination as a whole in these provinces or indeed in the country.

Final Declaration and release of results:

Having studied all the evidence at hand on the management and conduct of the National Senior Certificate examinations administered by the Department of Basic Education, Umalusi is satisfied that nothing has compromised the integrity or credibility of the examinations process. We are satisfied that the examinations were fair, valid and credible. We commend DBE for running a successful and credible examinations process. Accordingly, we hereby approve the release of the results of the National Senior Certificate Examinations administered by the Department of Basic Education.

 

4.2 National Senior Certificate Examinations administered by the Independent Examinations Board (IEB)

Ø  In total, 9 976 full time and 475 part time candidates were enrolled for the NSC examinations set and administered by the Independent Examination Board.

Ø  A total of 65 subjects were presented for standardisation.

Ø  After moderation, raw marks were accepted for 43 subjects. This figure represents 66, 15% of the subjects for which raw marks were accepted after moderation.

Ø  Of the remaining 22 subjects,

-          Moderation with some downward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile was effected on 15 subjects,

-          Moderation with some upward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile was effected on 7 subjects.

-          Final declaration and release of results:

-          Having studied all the evidence at hand on the management and conduct of the National Senior Certificate examination administered by the Independent Examinations Board, Umalusi is satisfied that nothing has compromised the integrity or credibility of the examinations process. We are satisfied that the examinations were fair, valid and credible. We commend IEB for running a successful and credible examinations process. Accordingly, we hereby approve the release of the results of the National Senior Certificate Examinations administered by the Independent Examinations Board on a date to be determined by IEB.

 

4.3 National Senior Certificate Examinations administered by the South African Comprehensive Assessment Institute (SACAI)

Ø  In total, 1190 candidates were enrolled for the NSC examinations set and administered by the SACAI.

Ø  A total of 27 subjects were presented for standardisation.  

Ø  After moderation, raw marks were accepted for 24 subjects. This figure represents 88,8% of the subjects for which raw marks were accepted after moderation.

·                      Of the remaining 3 subjects, moderation with some upward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile.

·                      Final declaration and release of results:

Having studied all the evidence at hand on the management and conduct of the National Senior Certificate examinations administered by the South African Comprehensive Assessment Institute (SACAI), Umalusi is satisfied that nothing has compromised the integrity or credibility of the examinations process. We are satisfied that the examinations were fair, valid and credible. We commend SACAI for running a successful and credible examinations process. Accordingly, we hereby approve the release of the results of the National Senior Certificate Examinations administered by the South African Comprehensive Assessment Institute (SACAI) on a date to be determined by SACAI.

 

4.4 The General Education and Training Certificate (GETC) ABET level 4 administered by the DHET

Ø   (26) Learning Areas were presented for standardisation.

Ø  Of the (26) learning areas standardised, raw marks were accepted for (11) learning areas. Moderation with some downward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile was effected on (06) learning areas and moderation with some upward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile was effected on (10) subjects. Umalusi, however remains concerned with the overall poor performance of candidates in the GETC examinations ABET level 4.

Final declaration and release of results:

On the basis of its monitoring and moderation processes, and the evidence before it, Umalusi is satisfied that there were no serious irregularities that could undermine the credibility of the examinations. The Council is therefore of the opinion that the examinations were conducted in a credible manner and therefore approves the release of the results for the  GETC ABET level 4.  The results of individual candidates will be released on the dates determined by the DHET after Umalusi has verified the accuracy of the resulting data.

4.5 General Education and Training Certificate – (ABET, Level 4) administered by the IEB

Ø  In total, 2 486 candidates sat for the GETC ABET examinations under the auspices of the Independent Examination Board.

Ø  8 learning areas were presented for standardisation.

Ø  Following moderation, raw examination marks were accepted in all 8 learning areas.

Ø  Final declaration and release of results:

Ø  Having studied all the evidence at hand on the management and conduct of the General Education and Training Certificate – (ABET, Level 4)   examination administered by the Independent Examinations Board, Umalusi is satisfied that nothing has compromised the integrity or credibility of the examinations process. We are satisfied that the examinations were fair, valid and credible. We commend IEB for running a successful and credible examinations process. Accordingly, we hereby approve the release of the results of the GETC ABET  Examinations administered by the Independent Examinations Board on a date to be determined by IEB.

 

4.6 GETC (ABET Level 4) Examinations administered by Benchmark

Ø  In total, 58 candidates were enrolled for the GETC examinations set and administered by Benchmark.

Ø  A total of 2 learning areas were presented for standardisation.  

Ø  After moderation, raw marks were accepted for 2 learning areas. This figure represents 100% of the learning areas for which raw marks were accepted after moderation.

4.7 Other Examinations administered by the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET)

 

4.7.1 NC(V) levels 2-4

Ø  A total of (241) subjects (84) Level 2, (81) Level 3 and (76) level 4 subjects were subjected to the standardisation process.

Ø  Raw marks were accepted for (125) subjects (52%) while moderation with some downward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile were effected on (78) subjects and moderation with some upward shifts towards the average historical learner performance profile were effected on (30) subjects.

Ø  The percentage of raw marks accepted not only indicates a stabilising qualification but also attests to the accuracy of the Umalusi standardisation decisions over the past few years.

4.7.2 NATED N1-N3

Ø  A total of (86) subjects were presented for standardisation.

Ø  Of the (83) subjects standardised, raw marks were accepted for (46) subjects, with only minor moderation adjustments being approved for the remaining 27 subjects.

Ø   

            Final Declaration and Release of the results

The Umalusi Council studied the results of the November 2014 NC(V) Level2-4 and the NATED N1-N3 examinations submitted by the DHET and has provisionally approved the release of the results for the NC(V) Level2-4 and the NATED N1-N3 examinations. Based on the evidence before it Umalusi  is  of the opinion that the examinations were conducted in a credible manner. However the release of the results is approved with the following proviso:

Ø  That Umalusi verifies and confirms the accuracy of the resulting data prior to the DHET releasing the results

Ø  The results of the following NATED subjects under investigation for alleged irregularities are blocked pending the outcome of the investigation:

o    Electrical Trade Theory N3

o    Fitting and Machining Theory N1

o    Plant Operation Theory N1

Ø  A full report on the investigation must be submitted to Umalusi before the results of these subjects can be standardised.

Ø  The results of the following NATED subjects that could not be standardised due to less than 80% capture rate be made available to Umalusi for standardisation and approval as soon as possible:

o     Plant Operation Theory N3

o    Patternmakers’ Theory N2

o    Refrigeration Trade Theory N2

 

This brings us to the end of the presentation on the release of the November 2014 examination results.

 

Conclusion…

Ø     Umalusi Council is pleased that the system is stabilising well and has reached a significant level of maturity as evidenced by the high percentage of subjects whose raw marks were accepted after the moderation process.

Ø     We must spare no effort in ensuring that we strengthen our education from the bottom up and continue to strive for excellence in teaching and learning because we cannot depend on the standardisation process to bring about improvement in the classroom.

Ø     On behalf of Umalusi Council, I wish to extend our hearty congratulations to all the learners who have done well in their examinations. Warm congratulations also to their teachers, parents, guardians and all those who have supported these learners in their studies.

Ø     To those who have not succeeded, there is another chance for you next year! Work hard and do well next year.

Ø     Wishing you all the best for 2015.

Ø     Thank you. 

Prof John Volmink

Chairperson of Council

Umalusi

 

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Written By: Administrator Account
Date Posted: 1/11/2016
Number of Views: 5537

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