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THEME: TEACHER DEVELOPMENT AND LANGUAGE

Written By: DBE, JET
Published: 10/7/2019

Large classes have been a reality for the vast majority of South Africa's pupils. This situation was aggrevated by the fact that for many pupils enrolled in farm schools or in remote rural areas, classes also tended to combine a number of grades. This literature survey on large class teacing and pupil achievement was commissioned by the Joint Education Trust (JET) to help inform the work of the Presidential Education Initiative (PEI). This survey was intended to inform national and provincial education departments in their policy and planning for teacher development and focuses exclusively on large class teaching and pupil achievement.

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Written By: RADMASTE Centre, University of Witwatersrand
Published: 1/1/1999

This research was funded by a grant from the Presential Education Iniative (PEI). The provision of ongoing professional support in the form of In Service Education for Teachers
(INSET) is an area of concern to most South African educators. At the one extreme, INSET can be provided to teachers by total removal from school for a fortnight or so. During this time the teacher is totally focused on the course work on offer and is expected to implement the ideas on their return to school. This model is supposedly cost effective as it brings together all the teachers to a single location. The former Department of Education and Training (DET) practised this approach to INSET. At the other extreme, some people believe that the maximum benefits of INSET are derived when the work is done inside individual schools where teachers can be followed up in class and assisted on site. This model for the implementation of INSET is labour intensive as an individual INSET trainer can seldom work with more than a handful of schools at a time but is nonetheless favoured by most educational Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs) inside SA. In between these two extreme models, there is a continuum for implementing INSET through a varying mix of these two, for example regionally or district based training sessions followed by limited intervention in the classroom. Cost effectiveness aside this study aims to contrast the two extreme models of implementation outlined in terms of which of the two leads to changed teaching practises sooner. The national implementation of OBE at the Grade 1 level in 1998 has provided an invaluable context for the research.

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Written By: Department of English and CALSSA, UCT
Published: 10/7/2019

This research was funded by a grant from the Presential Education Iniative (PEI) and formed part of the National Language Project (NLP). The purpose of the study was to investigate ways in which learners' learning styles matched the different teaching modes or teaching styles used in sevel selected primary schools in Cape Town. By focusing on language learning styles and learning strategies, the project was also able to analyse the various ways in which learners, as individuals, respond to the challenge of learning in a multilingual environment. The study examined the pedagogical strategies used in multilingual classes on the premise that, for teachers to create an optimal learning environment, the teaching strategies should be congruent with the learning styles of individual learners.

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Written By: PRAESA, University of Cape Town
Published: 9/1/1998

This research was compiled for the Joint Education Trust in terms of the Present's Education Initiative (PEI). The objective of this study was to identify existing teaching and classroom management strategies used by teachers in multilingual classrooms in primary schools in the Western Cape, with a particular focus on township schools; to identify problems that arise in multilingual classrooms in primary schools in the Western Cape; and to propose, on the basis of preliminary trials, strategies that are likely to success in addressing these problemes.

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Written By: Department of Education - Rhodes University
Published: 10/1/1998

This report was commissioned y the President's Education Initiative (PEI). It provides a short account of language policy in education. This points to an underlying ambivalence in the policy, which emanates from tensions between the expressed need for 'redress' for African languages and the right 'choice' in a society where these languages are largely undervalued. Againt this backdrop, this report describes an intervention which is the subject of the evalaution. It reveals its missionary origins, its moral sensibility - in particualr, the belief that there is a moral obligation on South Africans to learn an African language. The discussion focuses on teacher education, linking the broader linguistic context to the success and failures of the intervention in question.

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